The Blurred Line Between TV and YouTube: what it means for advertisers

As more and more people turn to YouTube for their entertainment, it is getting more and more difficult to track exactly how many viewers a TV program gets. For example, I think everyone has watched – or at least heard about – Saturday Night Live’s skit in which Melissa McCarthy impersonates White House Press Secretary, Sean Spicer. We all know SNL airs on NBC on Saturday nights (duh), but is that when and where you watched it? Or did you watch it on YouTube?

Watching YouTube videos on smart TV with home media sharing technology.

In a recent Think with Google article, Google discussed how more viewers are watching TV programs on YouTube, and even casting what they are watching on YouTube to their televisions. According to their research, adults are 5x more likely to prefer online platforms over cable TV.

In another Think with Google article, they discussed how programs like ‘Carpool Karaoke’ on the Late Late Show with James Corden – despite being a successful TV program – frequently gets more views on YouTube than on TV.

“The blurred lines of video consumption have changed the way success of any TV show should be measured. That’s particularly true for us since we originally air after midnight. We’re in the relevance business. The first thing we do when we come in in the morning is look at how our videos performed on YouTube. Our executive producer, Ben Winston, says, ‘The overnight ratings just tell us who managed to stay awake past midnight. The YouTube numbers tell us which bits flew.’ I couldn’t agree more.

Case in point: Viewership of ‘Carpool Karaoke’ on YouTube regularly eclipses viewership on the show itself.”

So what does this mean for advertisers? It could mean that the money being spent on TV ads (about $72 billion last year) could be better suited for YouTube. This is one reason that YouTube is now rolling out a Web-TV service called YouTube TV. For just $35/month, customers can sign up for a package consisting of about 40 channels. It has also been speculated that YouTube TV will get about 2 minutes of ad time per hour to sell to advertisers.

It also means that Google’s targeting methods can now be utilized in the TV space, and Google can now sell their advertising in the network ad slots that would have typically gone to cable operators. But Google is insistent that they are not trying to take money away from TV, they just want to play in the TV space.

Will you sign up for YouTube TV if it comes to Canada? Will you be willing to spend $35/month? Let us know in the comment section!

The Changing Face of Television Advertising

Watching TV used to be a common practice; Thursday evenings were reserved for watching your favorite weekly drama, and who can forget buckling in for an hour of intense reality gameshows like Survivor on Monday nights?

How we watch TV has changed
The television game has changed drastically over the last few years. With a smart phone in every pocket and access to the internet almost anywhere, keeping up-to-date with who’s heart was broken on The Bachelor, or which super car was driven on Top Gear no longer depends on getting to your TV in time.

Thanks to technologies like PVR and On Demand programs, viewers are still loyally tuning into their favorite programs except now they can watch what they want, when they want. For advertisers, this means there are even more ways to reach consumers and advertising on TV can still allow advertisers to be there for that part of the customer’s journey.

We know that companies like Expedia, Netflix, and Facebook (and Strathcom) have developed ways to personalize user experiences. My Netflix looks different than your Netflix because of their algorithm. Expedia will show me different hotels than it will show you based on what each of us viewed on their site. Strathcom can personalize the way your website appears based on the location and/or the pages clicked by the user. So how can advertisers adopt this strategy when promoting their brand through TV? Google has answered this question with Addressable Advertising.

Advertisers can now target specific households
Advertisers can show different ads to different households while they are watching the same program. This form of advertising lets the advertiser scale down to show the most relevant and interesting content to the viewer. In other words, you can share your message with only those that are most likely to be interested in your ad.

With any new technology, there are going to be challenges. There were some concerns about the ability to achieve accurate measurement and implementation with Addressable Advertising. However, with the launch of DoubleClick Dynamic Ad Insertion, Google has seen a huge advancement in how to achieve reliability in measurement for this new form of advertising!

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