Every Generation is the Facebook Generation

phone screen with social media applications of Whatsapp, Facebook, Twitter, Linkedin and Periscope while a male finger is about to touch on Facebook app.

Facebook. What started out in a college dorm room has since grown into one of the largest advertising platforms available. Yet, there are many companies that still do not realize the potential Facebook has to offer their business.

One common objection we hear about Facebook advertising is “I’m not on Facebook, and my customers aren’t on Facebook”, or “people my age and older aren’t on Facebook”. Although this sounds like a reasonable objection, the data simply does not back it up.

There are 22 million Canadians on Facebook, and 17 million of them are on Facebook every day. The population of Canada is about 35 million people, meaning that about 63% of Canadians are on Facebook, and almost 50% are on Facebook every day. When one considers that 1 in 2 Canadians are on Facebook, suddenly the “people my age aren’t on Facebook” argument seems unlikely.

Also, a recent study by Sprout Social looked at which social platforms each generation – Millennials (ages 18-34), Gen Xers (ages 34-54) and Baby Boomers (ages 55+) – engage with the most. They surveyed 1,000 people from each demographic and the results showed that, actually, every generation is the Facebook generation.

43.6% of those surveyed chose Facebook as their social network of choice. 64.7% of Gen Xers chose it and 65.2% of Baby Boomers chose it. That’s right, out of all three generations, the highest percentage came from those aged 55+. 65.2% of Baby Boomers chose Facebook as their social media platform of choice

Another interesting discovery in this study is which generations are most likely to follow a brand on social media. They found that 48.6% of Millennials currently follow brands, and 48.8% of Gen Xers currently follow brands.  That means almost half of people aged 35-54 have opted-in to following brands on social media. Is your brand available to them?

But what about Generation Z? Even though Sprout did not survey anyone from this generation, there are a plethora of articles out there trying to figure this generation out. Many suggest that SnapChat is going to be that generation’s Facebook, but according to an article by Contently:

“67 percent of older Gen Zers regularly use Facebook, while 50 percent name the Facebook-owned Instagram—only one percentage point behind Snapchat. Facebook was also named by 26 percent of respondents as the social network they use ‘constantly,’ compared with 23 percent for Snapchat. Nearly half of respondents said they log onto Facebook multiple times a day”.

One of the most basic lessons in advertising is to be where your customers are and where your competition isn’t. It’s been proven that your customers are, in fact, on Facebook; but right now, a lot of your competition is not advertising there. Give us a call today to get started and get $500 in bonus spend to put towards your next lead-generating campaign.

Millennials’ Growing Purchasing Power

Good news for the auto industry!

Contrary to the popular belief that auto sales would dwindle with the rise of millennials, it turns out that they are actually longing for vehicle ownership. Turns out the selfie-generation is also the generation of self-transportation.

Happy millennials on vacation

Young people have moved beyond ride-sharing services. This is indicated in studies showing that companies like Uber and TappCar are used only for specific events and purposes, which suggests that ride-sharing services could become a means of replacing cabs, but not necessarily car ownership. In 2014, for the first time, millennials purchased more vehicles than generation X. As time goes on, we can expect further purchasing power from millennials to dictate automotive trends. In fact, the growing amount of choices in the sport-utility segment are a reflection of millennial trends.

You can read more about this study here!

Website Personalization

personalized starbucks cups

As a millennial, I can admit that I come from a generation of people that like to feel recognized. Afterall, we are the Netflix-watching, Starbucks-drinking, everyone-is-special generation. If you don’t believe me, here are some stats:

  • According to a study by Janrain, 74% of people get frustrated when websites have content, offers, or ads that have nothing to do with their interests.
  • 62% of people under 34 years old are willing to share their location for more relevant content.
  • 40% of consumers will buy more from a retailer that personalizes the shopping experience across all channels.

You might be thinking that these are just a bunch of random percentages and that just because millennials generally shop this way, doesn’t mean you necessarily have to sell this way.


But consider your own experience. Don’t you like being able to have your own, separate Netflix account so you don’t have to dig through the programs your spouse, friends, or your kids watch? Don’t you appreciate it when Amazon shows you the products they know you will be interested in? I don’t know about you, but I appreciate it when companies make things easier for me.

At Strathcom, we know that personalized content is something your potential customers want. This is why we developed our website personalization tool. This tool keeps track of the pages your visitors look at so next time they visit your site they are shown content relevant to their needs.

With our website personalization tool, you are able to customize the image, the video, the messaging, and the calls-to-action based on the inventory viewed by each individual user. If they are a student looking at vehicles that are at a lower price point, you can change the image or video to a small car and the messaging to “check out our vehicles under $10,000”, for example. Or if they are a lawyer looking at more high-end, luxury models, you can change the image to a video slider that showcases luxury details. Since these visitors likely aren’t as interested in special offers as they are in showing up their neighbours, you can change the messaging to “only 2 left in stock” to utilize their fear of missing out.

This is just one of the ways we can personalize your site. For more information on our other tools such as Notepad, Geo-Fencing, and Silent Salesman, drop us a line at info@strathcom.com  or subscribe to our newsletter!

What’s New With YouTube?

Ashley Hahn, Brand Strategy Lead from Google, gave us a great update and presentation on what’s going on with Canada’s second favorite search engine, YouTube. Couple fun facts about YouTube:

  • 400 minutes of content uploaded to YouTube every minute, that’s more content creation than the big three networks have put together in the past 5 years combined.
  • Canada loves YouTube, 26.6 million monthly users, reaches 84% of the online population in Canada

In my opinion YouTube is still greatly underutilized by Canadian auto dealers.  Although there are a variety of reasons, video production and quality have always been at the top of the list of why dealers aren’t on YouTube.  Well, you’re in luck!  YouTube has just released a new app call YouTube Director.  This is a slick new app designed to help the average dealer or SMB get on YouTube.  

Okay, so maybe you have filmed a video or two, what else?  YouTube is a great medium to help generate awareness, but the power of YouTube’s platform is the targeting.  Ashley provided an example of how we can target the ‘true self’, not just the demographic self of an individual that might be valuable to your business.   

  YouTube - Demographic Self vs True SelfYouTube - Demographic Self vs True SelfYouTube - Demographic Self vs True Self

We know that lots of Canadians go to YouTube and they go to YouTube by choice.  The days of watching what’s on just because it’s on are long gone.  YouTube can help you reach the undecided, not the uninterested, consumer that matters to your business.

How about some good examples from outside the auto vertical!

  • Warby Parker Help – an online eye wear company that answers questions and demo’s products using YouTube.  Video quality is good but not Hollywood good. This has direct application to our industry.
  • Geico Unskippable ad – Ad Age campaign of the year and super funny.  It’s all about context! We all hate when we don’t see that Skip Ad button, so have some fun with it like Geico.
  • Dollar shave club  We have all seen this video, it’s been watched over 23 million times.  The success of this video helped Dollar Shave Club recently get sold to Unilever for $1B.  Not bad
  • First YouTube video uploaded 18 seconds of non-sense, you know, in case you were curious.

Our habits with YouTube and online video in general have changed.  We used to watch it at home, alone, in isolation.  Now we watch videos in public with our friends.  I am watching these YouTube clips on a flight with a colleague.  The times have changed!  YouTube was driven to prominence by millennials, but it is certainly not just for millennials anymore.  Not to mention those same millennials now have cash and purchasing power – probably individuals worth targeting.

It is only going to get worse (or more important depending on how you look at it).  Variety did a survey of American teens that revealed YouTube stars are far more popular than traditional celebrities. That’s right, PewDiePie is cooler than Katy Perry.

 In summary, YouTube: underutilized by Canadian auto dealers + hugely popular with Canadians + great targeting abilities = one massive opportunity for you.

The Voice of YouTube

Unless you’ve been living under a rock, you know that YouTube is a video-sharing website growing in popularity since it was founded in 2005. But do you know just how influential this website is becoming?

In 2014, the University of Southern California conducted a survey among 13-18 year-olds in the United States. The teens were asked to rate the influence English-speaking YouTube stars and “traditional celebrities” had on them. The top 5 places on the list were taken by YouTube stars. In 2015, they conducted the survey again and this time, YouTubers took the top 6 places; they were ranked even higher than some of the most influential celebrities like Bruno Mars and Taylor Swift. Yes, T-Swift.

There is another interesting phenomenon among YouTubers: they all seem to have the same voice. Julie Beck wrote an article about this in December for The Atlantic. The article describes how Julie began noticing certain commonalities between the way YouTubers enunciate and pronounce their words. She lists several examples of YouTubers that speak in this “bouncy” way, including Tyler Oakley, Franchesca Ramsey and Hannah Hart. Julie decided to investigate; she spoke with a linguist named Naomi Baron who not only agreed with her, but also actually explained the components of what she calls the “YouTube voice:”

  1. Overstressed vowels
  • Ehxample
  1. Sneaky extra vowels
  • This example is tericky
  1. Long vowels
  • Exaaample
  1. Long consonants
  • Exammmple
  1. Aspiration
  • Exampuhle

Additional techniques used by YouTubers include changing their speaking pace, moving their head and hands, raising and lowering their eyebrows, and even opening their mouth more.

This is not only an effective way to keep an audience, it’s also a popular way of speaking. Naomi Baron says, “Things become stylish. That happens with language all the time.” Hosts of TV Newscasts and satires, such as Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert, can also be found speaking this way.


YouTube did not invent this way of speaking, however. Another linguist named Mark Liberman calls it the “intellectual Used-Car Salesman voice” or the “talking to the audience voice.” The example he gave was of a carnival barker shouting to people passing by to attract them to their carnival booth. Since they had only their voice and their words, they had to make what they were saying as enticing as possible. This principle also applies to YouTubers and salespeople that perhaps have only themselves and a camera, or themselves and a car.

Speaking with this voice is common, whether a person is making a sales presentation, selling a car or talking to a camera. There’s a reason it’s becoming more and more popular: it works. Just ask some of these YouTube stars’ millions of viewers:

Name YouTube Channel # of Subscribers (approximate)
Felix Kjellberg PewDiePie 40 million
Ian Hecox & Anthony Padilla Smosh 22 million
Benny & Rafi Fine Fine Brothers 14 million
Olajide Olatunji KSI 11 million
Lindsay Stirling Lindsay Stirling 7 million

These young stars are also making a lot of money with their YouTube channels; Felix Kjellberg earned about $10 million last year, for example. So what could these videos possibly be about, you ask? Certainly, it is not only their voice and speech mannerisms which earn them this kind of fame, right? Well, Felix’s videos, for example, consist of his commentary on videogames he plays. To see what other famous YouTube celebrities are doing, you will just have to watch for yourself.

What 500 Millennials Told Strathcom Media about Buying Cars Online



Strathcom Media’s President, Duncan Cochrane, has recently returned to Edmonton for a brief layover between automotive conferences.

Last week he was at the 2015 Auto Remarketing Canada Conference in Toronto, where he presented in a panel discussion entitled “Marketing to Millennials: What Changes and What Stays the Same?” 

The timing couldn’t have been any better. Duncan’s presentation came at the same time as the Auto Remarketing Magazine published his breakdown of our quarter-long survey of millennial buying habits. (This double achievement likely accounts for another accolade we’re excited to announce soon…)

We now republish this article for you to read in its entirety.

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